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Cooking for your sick cat

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Mar. 24th, 2006 | 05:25 am

My cat is sick, but will stay comfortable and may get a bit better if she'll eat. I can't force her, but I do know there are better and worse ways to try to get her to take in some food, unfortunately learned from present and past experience.

(note: Gizmo died in November, 2006. She was an awesome friend of mine for a very long time. Her life was good, even at the end, and it was longer than it might have been because of the knowledge I developed and recorded below. I hope this will be useful to others with sick cats).

First, PAY ATTENTION! This is advice for feeding ill cats in crisis, not for everyday diets. These aren't especially complete notes, and aren't suitable for every cat in every household. The author of this post is NOT A VETERINARIAN. If your pet is sick, you MUST CALL A VET IMMEDIATELY AND GET PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANCE. If you are sent home with instructions like "try to get her to eat something" then this post IS for you. But your pet needs and deserves professional care. You can only get that from a vet, not from a web page.

The standard advice found online and from vets - that seems to be repeated from one source to the next - is too vague for action. My favorite is "be creative." When my pet is sick, I don't want to be creative. Just tell me what to do!

(photo of Gizmo by my friend (and hers) Jon).

Even the piggiest cat may stop eating if feeling discomfort, even if they're hungry and can hold down food. The vets tell me that if a cat doesn't eat regularly (daily), liver damage can occur, leading to an irreversible downward spiral even if everything else is OK. Eating regularly matters a lot for cats.

Cat food
Stinky food is best, anything to stimulate the appetite. Too bad for your stinky house after.

Don't forget that "food" includes the cat's favorite treats. My cat loves Pounce treats, and even when she's been sick lately, she can eat half a dozen of these at once. I believe that eating stimulates more eating, so think of them as an appetizer or after-dinner snack or reward for eating. Don't over-do it; they aren't a substitute for dinner. Spread them out over time, to keep the cat in the habit of eating anything and so the special-ness doesn't wane.

The first step is to buy half a dozen or so cans of different kinds of food at a grocery. Also be sure to have some of the cat's "regular" food favorites around, but keep in mind that the cat's tastes may change and she may reject old favorites. This doesn't necessarily mean the cat won't eat anything, just that you've got to find out what she'll go for. You will be throwing some of these away when they're rejected... and you need to keep a list if you can't remember what worked and to know what haven't been tried yet when you go back for another half-dozen. Fancy Feast in the little cans is a good choice because you can do a lot of sampling for not a lot of money. If your cat doesn't like old school ground food, save Science Diet and other "Senior" stuff for last, cuz that's what it is. It's nutritious but ugly and, at least with my cats, not considered "food".

Human food
Some human food is also worth trying. If your cat is not eating, then getting any food at all into her is what matters. Forget most of what you have heard about human food lacking the right ingredients for cats. Put food in stomach first, and deal with a well balanced diet after the emergency.

Don't be an idiot and feed the cat something that will kill her. Chocolate is right out, and for the rest of things to not feed cats, search the web. Cats are true carnivores and need meat to survive. Feed them animals.

My sick cat likes fish, so my list is biased toward human-packaged fish:
- The inexpensive, big can of salmon from Trader Joe's
- Cheap flake tuna in water from any grocery (some cats may prefer tuna in oil, though it's getting harder to find)
- Chicken of the Sea canned salmon
- Milk ... try everything from skim up to heavy cream, full fat vanilla ice cream and skim to whole milk yogurt, if you aren't sure what your cat will drink. Mine won't drink cream, only likes skim milk. I guess I taught her to eat well. I wish she'd drink a little cream though, for the calories.

Baby food
Every vet and web site I've seen suggests baby food for the sick cat. This is what I know about baby food:
- it tastes awful, to humans (me) and apparently to some cats too
- it's expensive
- there are maybe three meat-only (no onion powder/spices) baby food items in the whole section of maybe 100+ kinds of baby food. These little jars cost a dollar apiece.

That said, if you want to try baby food, here are some things I learned recently (no baby to practice with):
- baby food is not stocked with other food, but in the baby aisle, which is the bright, powdery smelling aisle in the middle of the store. Look for the 10-foot high wall of diapers. When in doubt, follow that woman with the kid in the baby seat atop the cart, or the guy in a big hurry who looks like he hasn't slept in a week.
- most baby food is made of veggies and fruit. Don't waste your cat's time. However the applesauce and peach puree are pretty yummy. Consider buying some for yourself, for a tasty and easy to digest treat.
- The plain-meat stuff is now marketed as "Second foods" and has a big "2" on the label.

Bonus insider tip for blog readers: if you come by my house this week and I offer the "lamb or beef pate" on a cracker, don't take it.

Cat milk
Not derived from milking female cats, this is merely lactose-free cow's milk with a few things added, then marked up dramatically to $2.99. My cats hate it. I hate it. Read the box in the pet store and you will see that you can make your own cat milk from... lactose free cow's milk and some other stuff that may or may not matter to an ill cat, like yeast and other icky garbage.

Preparation and presentation
Watch how the cat is eating... if she is licking up the gravy around the food but not loading up on the substance of it, this shows she does like the flavor and that's a good sign. But you need to work on the size of the chunks.

Put some of the food in a shallow dish - a saucer or side plate - add some warm water to make it soupy (maybe 1 T water for every 2T food) then mash it with a fork if it's amenable to that (most cat food is, as is the aforementioned human food). Now you have a nice soupy broth with flaked meat in the dish, and some on your shirt. Don't worry, it'll wash out.

Adding the water is important because you're sneaking some more hydration into her.
You can also throw some fish (e.g. the trader joe's salmon) in a blender with a little water and crank on it until it's a nice mousse consistency. Mix in some water and nuke when serving. This is great for cats that have trouble even with flakes of meat.

If you're going to feed the cat on the spot, nuke any food for about 10 to 15 seconds, then stir with your finger to make sure it's not too hot, and that there are no hot or cold spots. Also make sure the plate hasn't gotten extremely hot in any spot... if the plate's hot, re-plate so the cat doesn't burn her tongue and think the food hurts.


Plating & Presentation
As with people, the appearance, aroma and texture of food matter. One important difference is that cats are not as hung up on pretty things as people are, but are critical of flavor and substance. The cat will not be as easily misled as a person.

Serve in a shallow dish or saucer with sides high enough to keep the slurry on the dish but lower than the ordinary "food dish" that rises several inches. Even a mostly-flat saucer will work ok for this if you don't slosh it around too much.

Heating the food improves the flavor and gets some smells going, which will stimulate the cat's appetite.

There is no feeding schedule with a sick cat. If the cat's up and about and could be enticed to eat, try to feed her. Leave some time between feedings so she doesn't get annoyed with you constantly shoving food at her.

And if you can't get the cat to the food, take the food to the cat. I've met Gizmo with a saucer of food on the floor/couch/chair where she's sitting... then gradually raised it toward her face as long as she showed interest, and held it there while she ate. Sometimes a cat that won't take itself to food will eat when presented with some. Obviously this can't go on forever, and the hope is that the rejuvenated and less-starved pet will begin to resume regular habits and seeking food. When she stops eating, don't force it. Do try to rotate the plate or change the angle... sometimes a cat will take some more bites from a differently-oriented plate. Cat logic. Can't explain it, but can work with it.

I sometimes place these cat-tapas plates in two or three places where she hangs out, so that she might find a snack on her own.... including (very important) the usual place where she's fed and watered.

Don't offer too many flavors at once. If she hits one she doesn't like, she may walk away from the whole smorgasbord... one or two at a time, and focus on the winners.

Where practical, put a blanket, towel or throw rug under the various feeding areas. There will definitely be some fish-slurry spilled while feeding the sick cat. It's easier to launder a towel than a carpet. I believe the change of texture/surface also helps signal a special area ("food!"), to the cat. User experience, baby!

Other
Quantity: 1 can of fancy feast (that cute little expensive can) per 3 lbs of body weight, is a guideline.

Keep the litter box clean, and the water bowl topped up with fresh water at the temperature your cat prefers. I found out after having them for a couple of years, that my cats liked their water at room temperature. They would stay away from a fresh bowl of water until it had been out a couple of hours. Drinking goes hand in hand with eating, and hydration is vital to the cat's health and comfort.

Finally, there is only so much you can do and none of this may help. Sick cats sometimes just don't want to eat. It's not your fault if that happens.

Other sources
Here's a great compilation, Feeding Your Cat written by a vet who actually knows what he's talking about. I found this after writing the above. Good info about the nutritional value (or absence) of commercial pet foods.

-- Jim

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What kind of fruits can cats eat? My

from: cmtheisen
date: Apr. 12th, 2006 04:45 pm (UTC)
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Hi! My name is Chris and I work at Help.com. One of our members posted a question and after reading your site I thought you might have the expertise give some advice. This person has asked:

"What kind of fruits can cats eat? My kitten loves bananas, apples, grapes, oranges? but should she eat them? i’d get pretty bored with round pellet food after awhile myself. She already eats Cat grass, I’m just wondering if she can eat other, off-the-cat-menu fruit & vegetable foodstuffs."

http://cloesams.blogs.help.com/post/3/what-kind-of-fruits-can-cats-eat

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Re: What kind of fruits can cats eat? My

from: jofishandjim
date: Apr. 18th, 2006 02:48 am (UTC)
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I'm not a vet and I have no special training in cat nutrition so I oughtn't give specific advice. I wrote this post to collect what I've discovered under duress, so others might not have to start from scratch during a critical and stressful time...

I think there is a lot to be said for cat boredom... it's bad enough that they've got nobody to talk to, and then yeah, those pellets are probably not too exciting after a while.

I think it's probably safe to say that any extras should be treats, not the core of the diet. Cats can't eat everything we eat, so check around before giving them random stuff. Otoh, I am often amazed at what cats enjoy. My cat is one of the minority that doesn't have trouble with milk, so she gets that from time to time. And she loves pork. Why don't they make pork cat food?

With my cats, the use in times of sickness of "more enticing" but less proper diets, has occasionally led to trouble as they decided they'd start to turn away from the properly balanced food, preferring the fun stuff... you have to wean them off it and back to the regular diet when they're feeling better.

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Do cats eat fruits?

from: anonymous
date: Jun. 14th, 2006 03:55 pm (UTC)
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: My cat loves mashed bananas, chopped apples that are SKINLESS only, shmushed grapes and chopped up pineapple. but my cats favorite treat of all is all of those listed in a smoothy! yuuuuuuuuuuummy!

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feeding sick cat

from: anonymous
date: Jul. 8th, 2006 01:40 am (UTC)
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Jim-- thanks! I have a sick cat and I'd be happy if I just got him to drink a little water. Your comments are great!
I'm going to try tuna water now.
-Kate

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Thanks!

from: anonymous
date: Aug. 6th, 2006 09:29 pm (UTC)
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This was extremely useful in treating one of our cats who is extremely ill at the moment. One of the things we've found with him and in the past is that sometimes just by elevating the dish it makes it easier for a cat to eat. Currently, for our sick cat, we have the water dish elevated so the water's surface is 9" from the floor -- he can't drink it easily when it is lower.

We use cut off pieces of 2x6 lumber to raise food and water dishes but if you live in the city and scap lumber isn't easy to come by a consideration would be using those Priority Mail boxes available at the post office. They come in a number of sizes and thicknesses.

Thanks again!

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Re: Thanks!

from: jofishandjim
date: Mar. 4th, 2007 04:41 am (UTC)
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This is great advice -- I agree that moving the food closer to the pet's face can be a huge help. Don't change too many things at once, but yes, definitely, it helps to think like a pet to work out these details. A big change I made was to switch from a bowl with deeper sides to either a flat plate or a plate with a low side, so she could more easily get to the food.

- jim

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Cooking for your Cat, and getting sick cat to eat

from: anonymous
date: Aug. 9th, 2006 01:15 pm (UTC)
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If a cat is too sick to eat, an easy way to get nourishment in is to use a paste made of cat food and milk or water, meat gravy, or in emergencies some karo syrup, and smear it on the cat's lips and side of mouth. The cat will instinctively lick the stuff and thus consume it.

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my cat has anorexia

from: anonymous
date: Aug. 24th, 2006 02:42 am (UTC)
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my cat doesn't want to eat anything, he tries a little bit but then it seems as if he had got tired of it and doesn't try it again, but I am concerned because he is in his bones, he can't be skinnier. like 4 days ago he couldn't even stand up and I think he is dying due to his anorexia.

I have tried lots of food and catsure in the last week and I am trying to feed him every hour or so, at least to bites or something.

I would appreciate some advice

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Re: my cat has anorexia

from: anonymous
date: Aug. 23rd, 2007 07:48 pm (UTC)
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Have you had this cat to a vet for gosh sakes? It could be something like kidney failure or feline leukemia, etc.

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thnx

from: anonymous
date: Sep. 6th, 2006 11:30 pm (UTC)
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thanx a bunch for your advice....she hadent eaten fer 4 days, but once i gave it some chicken and tuna it gobbled it all up.....thanx again ...my cat is playin around again ...yay!!!!

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My sick cat.

from: anonymous
date: Mar. 15th, 2008 06:33 am (UTC)
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My cat actually has an interesting problem. He won't eat because due to a genetic gum disease we had to remove all his teeth before he starved to death from the pain his teeth were causing him. We decided to go for the teeth removal because he isn't a very old cat yet, and we like having him around. Ever since the surgery, he's had a hard time eating, as we expected. We can now only feed him soft foods, but as of late, he refuses to eat at all. We have 4 selections, all soft foods, and all different flavors. We rotate through each can, and isolate him in the bathroom with the food, giving him plenty of privacy so our other cats don't bother him.

With the food, he just seems to stay at the edge, lap up the gravy, then try to grab onto chunks of food with his claws and lick it off. He's become incredibly skinny, and his reluctance to eat is becoming more resilient.

After reading this, it's given me a few ideas that I will try with him. Since he's got no teeth, i figure I can mix the food with water, as suggested above. His previous favorite flavor was salmon, though now it's hard to tell, so the other suggestion of bringing in canned tuna is completely possible, if ground into a certain consistency, it could be very easy for him to lap up.

Thank you for the guide, and if anyone else can offer me some more tips on feeding my toothless cat, that would be greatly appreciated.

Please email advice to Khalzar@gmail.com

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le_jaders

(no subject)

from: le_jaders
date: May. 2nd, 2008 12:24 pm (UTC)
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My cat is very sick and I've been having trouble trying to get her even to drink milk, I've just been dabbing it on her nose so that she licks it up (better then nothing). But you've helped me get some ideas on what to do about feeding her that I will try out tomorrow. Thanks!

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le_jaders

(no subject)

from: le_jaders
date: May. 2nd, 2008 12:27 pm (UTC)
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Also I read today that if your cat has kitty leukemia it is not good to feed them fish.

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Feeding sick cat

from: anonymous
date: Jul. 20th, 2008 02:24 am (UTC)
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My cat has temporary paralysis of the left side of her face and had stopped eating, couldn't give her anti-inflammatories unless she was eating so it was a bad situation. I tried canned and it didn't work. Vet gave me Hills Science Prescription Diet A/D and she started eating again. But when I ran out today, on the weekend, when they are closed til Monday, I tried pureeing his regular canned food and no dice.

Read up on the prescription stuff and it has a lot of liver in it, pork liver especially. So you can feed cats pork.

I found a canned cat food (Special Kitty) that has liver as one of the first ingredients, plus fish, pureed that, heated it up and success! Also bought a bunch of baby food so I'll try that if she stops eating this other stuff.
Thanks for the tips!

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Re: Feeding sick cat

from: jofishandjim
date: Jul. 23rd, 2008 05:40 pm (UTC)
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Smart thinking. That's the way to improvise :) Best wishes to you and your cat.

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Sewn Back Together Wrong

Thank you!

from: susanne_lisette
date: Sep. 5th, 2008 12:13 am (UTC)
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This is really helpful... Having already taken my sick kitty to the vet and seeing as I have a good idea what's wrong and am treating him under veterinary supervision, I just needed to know what might tempt his appetite while he's trying to recover. Thanks a million for compiling this info! Every other Google hit I got was useless. :p

I feel bad for you that so many ninnies can't seem take the time to thoroughly read your OP or look at the rest of your LJ long enough to figure out that you're just a cat-friendly cook and not a veterinary expert. Must be totally frustrating... but I hope you'll leave this post public and searchable anyway, because I think many people will find it very useful.

Thanks again!

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Re: Thank you!

from: jofishandjim
date: Sep. 13th, 2008 12:03 am (UTC)
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Suzanne, you are awesome. Thanks for the nice note and best wishes for your kitty :)

I will leave the post up. it's very popular. I know from my own experience that it's really hard to make that call to the vet because the news may not be what you want to hear, but we have to remember that as much as we depend on our pets for companionship, they depend on us for absolutely everything else, including their health and well being. Part of being a pet owner (the really hard part) is standing strong for your pets when they can't.

thanks again
- jim

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Blackie

from: anonymous
date: Dec. 16th, 2008 05:50 am (UTC)
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Thank you for your posting I found it soothing as it is 11:30 pm and
my cat had disapeared 4 nights ago when I tried to see why he was limping, he didn't let me get near and ran under the house. then it snowed for a day and still no Blackie and then he was in the flower garden curled up. I thought a car hit him because of his big collar bone,I put him under the sink and after the water went over him he
was just bones. He had a hole in his shoulder and his cheek, probably from a fight with another animal. I put some peroxide on him and then wonderdust and he stood for milk twice. I put him in an open box lined with many towels and cut an opening so there would be no effort should he need to exit the box and so he wouldn't feel trapped. As soon as a towel went over him he fell asleep. My husband says if he survives the night we'll take him to the vet, that Blackie just came home to die as he's at least 12 years old. Your blog gives me hope this night. Thank you very much.

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Not a lot of luck

from: anonymous
date: Jun. 20th, 2009 09:06 am (UTC)
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My cat had two operations in a row for dodgy teeth. He was in nice condition before the first operation (we spotted tooth-soreness early), but it has been downhill from there. After the last operation, the vet kept him for three days and was still unhappy with him and now Kitty is showing signs of diabetes. He's sent him home with me for the weekend with Hills A/H and electrolytes. Kitty has stopped eating and drinking by himself and is being syringe-fed and watered hourly. I'm at the end of the first full day at home and there's not been improvement. He's feeling very miserable. I'm to phone the vet tomorrow. It's likely my cat will be put down.

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My buddy won't eat either

from: anonymous
date: Aug. 10th, 2009 09:59 pm (UTC)
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My little guy was 16 lbs when he got a tick. He was getting his monthly tick preventative medications and yet the tick attached and didn't die. A few days after I pulled the engorged tick off his chest right by his right leg he fell ill. He ran a very high fever and was lethargic. I took him to the vet and they ran a ton of test and believe it must be lyme disease from the tick. They put him on an antibiotic and he had a reaction to it and slipped into a coma for 15 minutes or so. They got him back and put him on fluids for dehydration through an IV and also hydrated with under the skin injections of lots of fluids. After a few days on the new antibiotic and with the fluids he was able to come home. He refused to eat and it had now been almost a week and he had dropped to 10.5 lbs. I took him back in. He was now up and around and appeared to be feeling better but would not eat. He would regularly drink water, but no food at all. They ran a ton of test on him again including liver, kidney, leukemia, etc as well as x-rays to see if there was anything noticeable in the stomach. They have not found anything wrong. They instructed me to feed him by syringe some Hill A/D. I have been doing that for the last weekend as well as giving him antibiotics. He still will not take to food. Force feeding is no easy task and he is a very friendly cat and puts up with it much better than any other cat I've every had. Thanks for the additional ideas on what may entice him to eat solids again. I'll do and try anything for my buddy.

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Gwinna

(no subject)

from: gwinna
date: Aug. 10th, 2009 11:34 pm (UTC)
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Like many others, I want to say thank you for putting together this list. My cat developed kidney problems this week (out of no where, her blood tests for a teeth cleaning were fine last month), and will only consume liquids, and your ideas of tuna in oil and meat baby food have been very helpful.

Thank you again so much.

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Gwinna

(no subject)

from: gwinna
date: Aug. 10th, 2009 11:50 pm (UTC)
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Update: I just tried the moist treats you suggested, and that's the first solid food she's had in a week. Thank you for sharing your findings. You've helped out a lot of kitties out there! :)

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(no subject)

from: anonymous
date: Jan. 1st, 2010 02:47 am (UTC)
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My 17year old cat has moderate to severe kidney disease and she has stopped wanting to eat, at least I thought until I started mixing some of the canned foods with turkey baby food and she gobbled it rite down, just hope she keeps it down as she has IBS so I have always been hesitant on giving her greasy canned foods. Anyway, we'll see..thanks for the suggestions

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Thank you!!!

from: anonymous
date: Mar. 17th, 2010 04:10 pm (UTC)
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My cat Velvet is sick and not eating. She's seeing a vet, but that's not helpful in terms of getting her to eat. She hadn't eaten for days and I was really scared. Then somehow I ran across your blog and it was just the information I needed. Per your advice, I put her wet food with water in a blender that night, and voila she ate!!! She's been eating better every day. The "smoothies" are a big hit. You saved Velvet!

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re Cooking for sick cats: Big Thankyou!!!

from: barblovesroses
date: Jun. 3rd, 2010 07:05 am (UTC)
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Over the weekend our kitty, Salem, was hit by a car and ended up with a broken pelvis. He will be recovering here at home for several weeks. I am just about at my wits end with trying to figure out how to get him to eat as several of the medicines we have for his pain control really should be given to him with some food in him first, but he isn't interested in eating anything from his normal diet.

I am going to try some of the tips mentioned in some of the previous tips listed in the series of comments above my posting. I am so grateful to all of you who have posted your experiences with your kitties.

I want to mention one item that I have had success with getting Salem to eat which I haven't seen listed here: Yogurt. He loves it - In the past, I have given him the chance to lick the lids of my yogurt as a treat when I've been having some and found that he liked it so when he wouldn't eat any of his regular food, I decided to see if he would eat some yogurt and he was willing to eat that, in fact quite heartily. He wolfed down 2 teaspoons full the first time I offered him some, then this morning he went for 4 full teaspoons. I know he is getting some protein, calcium to help his healing bones, and of course the good digestive enzymes that are in the yogurt for his tummy.

So in conclusion, I want to thank you for starting this topic Jofishandjim, and everyone else who has contributed to it. For me, it is a godsend! I hope those of you who still have your kitties have had them return to normal health! Salem and I will be spending the next 3-6 weeks struggling to keep him quiet while he is on the mend and ask your prayers for him as he is forced to be cagebound during this period. It won't be easy for him as he loves to be outside on the prowl but right now, its just not going to be possible. Thankyou fellow cat lovers!

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No longer interested in eating after meeds?

from: anonymous
date: Jul. 19th, 2010 01:29 am (UTC)
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Alabar is 13 and having heart problems, the vet pulled 300cc of fluids from his chest and poor Mr cat is on a variety of meeds, for heart blood pressure and antibiotics and Silex to keep the fluids from building up. He was eating ok but the last couple days after starting the meds he is really not interested in any of his favorite things.

This thread is a wonderful collection of ideas and tips and in all this stress as a cat parent I have found it a big help, even 2 years after it was originated.

I have tried tuna fish soup, his all time favorite, in water. Some raw hamburger his second favorite thing iin the universe. Since he will not even eat those, I used the above blended cat food, water and added his vitamin dose to the mix. He won't eat but I can put it in his mouth with a dropper and he does get it down.

I think the meeds must be effecting him poorly. Being a good dad, he is going to the vet tomorrow afternoon.

So a thank you to you all. I am not sure what will happen with mr Alabar, I am really concerned with his quality of life at this point

Best regards to all of you

Jeremy(!)

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(no subject)

from: anonymous
date: Aug. 14th, 2010 01:15 am (UTC)
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THANK YOU THANK YOU. Great ideas and my sick little cat licked at some warm tuna soup and a bit of melty ice cream. So sorry for your loss as I am struggling now with the inevitable...but still some care time left!

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Feeding a sick cat

from: anonymous
date: Oct. 14th, 2010 09:22 pm (UTC)
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Feeding a sick cat is an absolute nightmare! Somehow after reading everyone else's trials and tribulations I feel a little better. Still trying creative techniques to get my Jordy (13) to eat, to make her feel better. But she just pukes up what ever I give her.

Thank you ALL for at least alleviating some of my frustration!!!
TK

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Kitty has neck tumor and can't swallow

from: anonymous
date: Oct. 29th, 2010 05:36 am (UTC)
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We're waiting on word whether Claudia has feline leukemia. She has a huge tumor on the side of her neck that seemingly appeared overnight. She had been losing weight since sneaking out a week & 1/2 ago, then became lethargic towards eating at all. She definitely wolfed down Greenies before the tumor was noticeable. I'm going to grind down a few & mix with some liquid to see if she can get that down.

There are (2) flavors of Fancy Feast that don't have meat-by-products and she likes them both. We blenderized the Fish Feast with some water and she was good with that. She also loves Appeteasers. I'm going to try the mousse idea with one of those. She's hungry, so that's a good sign.

This is an excellent post. Thank you so much.

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Rhonda Koch

Thank you

from: Rhonda Koch
date: Dec. 1st, 2010 01:45 pm (UTC)
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Thank you for your "recipes and tips". My cat has had eating issues for a couple of weeks now. I've taken her to a few vets. After getting xrays and ultrasounds she was diagnosed with cancer. Please DO NOT WAIT to get your cat to the vet if it is vomiting, has black tarry stool, or is hiding. These are all warning signs of cancer. The first Vet should have suspected this probably over a year ago. Repeated vomiting is not normal- no matter lack of teeth, hairball whatever.

Tuna in oil is useful, as well as raw turkey bits, condensed chicken noodle soup (broth only), and baby food with chicken or beef.

If you have a cat with cancer please check out ES Clear. It's an alternative medicine to help with cancer symptoms and seems to help make the cat eat.
Thanks and I hope this helps other owners.

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Rhonda Koch

Re: Thank you

from: Rhonda Koch
date: Dec. 2nd, 2010 05:59 am (UTC)
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A HUGE Thank You!!! The alaskan pink salmon from Trader Joe's has been a HIT! I opened it and she couldn't wait for me to put it in a blender and plate it!! The best luck I've had so far and she came back for seconds!
Way to pay it forward!

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sick cat

from: anonymous
date: Mar. 18th, 2011 10:06 pm (UTC)
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I am very thankful for your site. I had already done some of the things that you suggested. The additional ideas were wonderful, with the added humor. Thanks a lot.

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Wish I had read this sooner

from: anonymous
date: Apr. 2nd, 2011 01:44 am (UTC)
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Well, my kitty of 12 years developed gum disease. Sad to say I saw all of the signs and just did not put all of the pieces together until the infection was out of control. She has now lost most of her teeth and had to have surgery to remove an impacted tooth which was the worst one. Her gums were so destroyed that the vet could not sew up the hole because her gums were shredding. So we had to feed her via a syringe liquid food. I tried all of the items above and they do work. But we are beyond that now. She wants to eat but just can’t due to the pain. So this weekend she will have a feeding tube put in. I am told that cats do really well with these and that she is a good candidate because she is in good health and had a desire to eat, just can’t. Reading everyones comments were therapeutic. Part of me just wants’ to put all of this to an end but I love her and just feel partly responsible. Our lives are so busy that we failed to take proper care of her teeth. I am sincerely hoping all of this works and the money we are spending will at least buy her another 4 years with us. If any of you have any experience with feeding tubs, please respond. Thankfully she is now down to only 2 meds, twice a day. At one point she was on 4 meds twice a day. This has been traumatic for the both of us. I’m not sure either me or Audrey my cat can take anymore of this. Last night she looked deep into my eyes and just stared at me as if she were saying “Why are you doing this to me?”. She then let out a deep sigh. That is when I finally decided to consider the feeding tube option. Well, this journal has been running for several years now, congrats and thanks for taking the time to put this out there for us to benefit from.

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